Category Archives: Quizzes

Saturday Quiz – Musical Plants

Dear Readers, after the high culture of last week here’s something a bit more tuneful. All you need to do is match the plant to the lyrics from the (hopefully) popular song below. Normally I would knock up some photos, but as it’s year end at work (and some of you will know what that means!) I am just going to give you 10 plants and 10 lyrics, and all you have to do is match one to t’other. An extra mark for the full name of the song (or thereabouts)  and a discretionary mark if you can name the singer/band (though some of these are ancient, rather like me, and will therefore have been knocked up by multiple folk).

So, if you think that lyric 1 is about blackberry, your answer is 1/A

Now, if I spot that you have answered in the comments (and some of you are very very quick) I will send you a quick message and then unapprove your answer so that it doesn’t influence anyone else. However, if you think you might be influenced I would be inclined to write them down on a piece of paper first.

Answers on Friday next week, so get your ideas in by 5 p.m. UK time on Thursday 21st January if you want to be marked.

Lyrics

  1. ‘And you’ll look sweet, upon the seat, of a bicycle made for two’

2. ‘I beg your pardon…’

3.  ‘And then worst of all (worst of all)

You never call baby when you say you will (say you will)

   4. ‘Small and white, clean and bright,

You look happy to greet me’

   5. ‘Tiptoe, through the window,

By the window, that’s where I’ll be’

   6.  I lost myself on a cool damp night
I gave myself in that misty light
Was hypnotized by a strange delight.

7.You gonna need an ocean of calamine lotion
You’ll be scratchin’ like a hound
The minute you start to mess around

8. Ooh, I bet you’re wonderin’ how I knew
‘Bout your plans to make me blue

9. Absolutely going down the drain
It’s a terrible day
Up with a knock
Silly girl I don’t know what to say
She was running away

10. I was working part time in a five-and-dime
My boss was Mr. McGee
He told me several times that he didn’t like my kind
‘Cause I was a bit too leisurely

Seems that I was busy doing something close to nothing
But different than the day before
That’s when I saw her, ooh, I saw her
She walked in through the out door, out door

Plants

A. Blackberry

B. Lilac

C. Grape

D. Tulip

E. Poison Ivy

F. Daisy

G. Raspberry

H. Rose

I. Buttercup

J. Edelweiss

Onwards! Make me proud!

 

 

Saturday Quiz – The Poetry of Plants – The Answers

Some frosty fennel

Dear Readers, you really know your poems! On the basic quiz, Mike at Alittlebitoutoffocus got 7 out of 10, while FEARN, Anne and Fran and Bobby Freelove all got 10 out of 10 on matching the plants to the poems. Fran and Bobby then went the extra mile by also getting some of the poets, giving them a total of 16 out of 20. But runaway winner this week, with an amazing 20 out of 20 was Anne. Well done Anne! A fantastic result, but you should all be very proud of yourselves, and thank you for playing. Now, I wonder what will happen tomorrow?

1.C) Daffodils – ‘I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud’ by William Wordsworth. My Mum used to know this by heart, as she did many poems.

2. E) Cuckoo-pint/Lords and Ladies – ‘Cuckoo-pint’ by Blake Morrison. I love some of the imagery in this – the brown matchstick, the half-unrolled umbrella. Blake Morrison is better known as a writer of prose, but I think this is a most creditable work.

3. H) Ivy – ‘ To the Ivy’ by John Clare. I doubt there was ever a better poet of our  ‘weeds’, and I make no apology for including Clare twice.

4. J) Himalayan Balsam – ‘HImalayan Balsam’ by Anne Stevenson. What a great description this is! The whole poem is a feast.

5.D) Saguaro (Giant) Cactus – ‘To the Saguaro Cactus Tree in the Desert Rain’ by James Wright. Wright is a new poet to me, but I love that opening image of the owl peering from a hole in the tree.

6.A) Autumn Crocus – ‘Autumn Crocus’ by Ruth Fainlight. Such lovely close observation, and I love the way that the religious and natural imagery seem to infuse one another.

7. G) Yarrow – ‘The Yarrow’ by John Clare. Look how he notices the leaves of the yarrow, and the way that the colour of the flowers varies! The man was a genius.

8. B) Daisy – ‘To a Mountain Daisy – On Turning One Down With the Plough, in April 1786’ by Robert Burns. I love how Burns can move from the tiniest daisy to the existential fate of all human beings in a few verses. You might not want to read all of this if you’re already feeling glum.

9.I) Thistle – ‘Thistles’ by Ted Hughes. What a ‘male’ poem this is! I love Ted Hughes’s imagery in this, though, what with all those Vikings.

10.F) Gorse/Whin – ‘Whinlands’ by Seamus Heaney. Oh Seamus. What a poet. His poems always seem to involve an opening-out to me. At the end of them I just want to stare into space for a bit.

Saturday Quiz – The Poetry of Plants

Some frosty fennel

Special thanks to my friend A this week for the loan of her book ‘Flora Poetica’, edited by Sarah Maguire. Let me know when you want it back 🙂

Dear Readers, I feel that we are lacking poetry in our lives, so now is the moment to see if you can identify what plant each of these poems is going on about. Bonus points for the author! And if you have a favourite plant poem, let me know. No extra points, but it’s nice to share….

As usual, answers in the comments by 5 p.m. UK time on Thursday 14th January please if you want to be marked. The answers will appear on Friday 15th.

Match the plants to the poems: so, if you think poem 1 is about autumn crocuses, your answer is 1) A). As usual, I will hide the answers that appear in the comments when I see them, but if you don’t want to be influenced by speedy people, write your answers down first.

Onwards!

The plants are:

A) Autumn crocus

B) Daisy

C) Daffodil

D) Saguaro (Gian) Cactus

E) Cuckoo-pint/Lords and Ladies

F) Gorse/Whin

G) Yarrow

H) Ivy

I) Thistle

J) Himalayan Balsam

  1. Continuous as the stars that shine
    And twinkle on the milky way,
    They stretched in never ending line
    Along the margin of the bay:
    Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
    Tossing their heads in sprightly dance‘.

2. A brown matchstick held up in the wind, 
The bract-leaf cupped around it like a palm

March had not extinguished it: there it lurked,
sly as something done behind the sheds,

slithering from its half-unrolled umbrella
as we snipped pussy-willow in the lanes. 

3.But bloom of ruins, thou art dear to me,
When, far from danger’s way, thy gloomy pride
Wreathes picturesque around some ancient tree
That bows his branches by some fountain-side:
Then sweet it is from summer suns to be,
With thy green darkness overshadowing me. 

4. Orchid-lipped, loose-jointed, purplish, indolent flowers
with a ripe smell of peaches, like a girl’s breath through lipstick, 
delicate and coarse in the weedlap of late summer rivers,
dishevelled, weak-stemmed, common as brambles…. 

5. I had no idea the elf owl
Crept into you in the secret
Of night.

I have torn myself out of many bitter places
In America that seemed 
Tall and green-rooted in mid-noon.
I wish I were the spare shadow of the roadrunner, I wish I were
The honest lover of the diamondback 
And the tear the tarantula weeps.

I had no idea you were so tall 
And blond in moonlight. 

6. Anomalous bright blossom 
in late afternoon shadow

Mercury-pale stems 
surging out of the dark
earth: Halloween candles.

Mauve flowers with amber
yellow pollen-swollen anthers.

Each clump is bordered 
by a halo of rotting 
petals like votive objects
around a damaged Ikon 
or a martyr’s statue.

7. Dweller in pastoral spots, life gladly learns
That nature never mars her aim to please;
Thy dark leaves, like to clumps of little ferns,
Imbue my walk with feelings such as these;
O’ertopt with swarms of flowers that charms the sight,
Some blushing into pink and others white,
On meadow banks, roadsides, and on the leas
Of rough, neglected pastures, I delight
More even than in gardens thus to stray
Amid such scenes and mark thy hardy blooms
Peering into autumn’s mellowing day;
The mower’s scythe swept summer blooms away
Where thou, defying dreariness, wilt come
Bidding the loneliest russet paths be gay.

8. Wee, modest, crimson-tipped flow’r
Thou’s met me in an evil hour;
For I maun crush amang the stoure
They slender stem:
To spare thee now is past my pow’r
Thou bonie gem. 

9. Against the rubber tongues of cows and the hoeing hands of men
xxxxxxx spike the summer air
Or crackle open under a blue-black pressure.

Each one a revengeful burst 
Of resurrection, a grasped fistful 
Of splintered weapons and Icelandic frost thrust up

From the underground stain of a decayed Viking.
They are like pale hair and the gutturals of dialects. 
Every one manages a plume of blood.

Then they grow grey, like men.
Mown down, it is a feud. Their sons appear,
Stiff with weapons, fighting back over the same ground. 

10. All year round the xxxxx
Can show a blossom or two
But it’s in full bloom now.
As if the small yolk stain

From all the birds’ eggs in
All the nests of the spring
Were spiked and hung
Everywhere on bushes to ripen.

Hills oxidise gold.
Above the smoulder of green shoot
And dross of dead thorns underfoot
The blossoms scald.

Put a match under 
xxxxx, they go up of a sudden.
They make no flame in the sun 
But a fierce heat tremor

Yet incineration like that 
Only takes the thorn. 
The tough sticks don’t burn,
Remain like bone, charred horn.

Gilt, jaggy, springy, frilled
This stunted, dry richness
Persists on hills, near stone ditches,
Over flintbed and battlefield. 

Saturday Quiz – 2020 Vision – The Answers

Cycrolamen missing from last week’s post!

Dear Readers, an excellent turn out as usual, with some new folk having a go, welcome! Our winner this week was Sylvie with 12 out of 12, with Fran and Bobby Freelove getting 10 out of 12 and Claire getting 8 out of 12 – very creditable all round, so thank you for taking part. 

January

  1. Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria japonica var Elegans)

February

2. Alder (Alnus glutinosa)

March

3. Heavenly Bamboo (Nandina)

April

4. Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum)

May

5. Hoary Cress (Lepidium draba)

June

6. Black Horehound (Ballota nigra)

July

7. Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris)

August

8. Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)

September

9. Smoke Bush (Cotinus coggygria)

10. Rowan/Mountain Ash (Sorbus aucuparia)

November

11. Carrot (Daucus carota)

December

12. Lychee (Litchi chinensis)

 

 

Saturday Quiz – 2020 Vision

Cyclamen missing from last week’s post!

Dear Readers, what a year it’s been! And to round it off nicely, and ease us into 2021,  here is a ‘simple’ plant ID quiz. Each photo comes from a Wednesday Weed of the corresponding month. All you need to do is to ID the plant. Good luck! The answers will appear next Friday morning UK time (8th January 2021), so if you want to be ‘marked’, please get your responses into the comments by Thursday 7th January at 5 p.m. I will ‘unapprove’ any answers when I see them, so that they don’t distract other quizzers, but to be certain of not being influenced I would still write your answers down first.

Onwards!

January

  1. What species are these small red trees?

February

2. Can you name this tree?

March

3. What plant is this?

April

4. What’s this plant?

May

 

5. What plant is this?

June

6. What’s this plant?

July

7. What’s this plant?

August

8. What’s this plant?

September

9. What’s this extraordinary plant?

October

10. What species are these splendid street trees?

November

11. What root vegetable was used to play this tarantella?

December

12. What is this tropical fruit?

 

 

Winter Wonderland – The Answers!

Title Photo by Alan Wilson, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Polar Bear (Title Photo)

Dear Readers,  what a splendid showing we had with the quiz this time! It tested everyone to the limit. In third place was Mike from Alittlebitoutoffocus with a very respectable 21 out of 31 (I gave an extra mark for anyone getting the blood-thinner question right on the Christmas food section). In second place was Rosalind and her husband with 23/31. But the overall winners were Fran and Bobby Freelove who got an extraordinary 29/31. Well done to all of you, and thank you for taking part, you are all stars as far as I am concerned. 

Winter Wonderland 1 – Winter Trees

Photo One by http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Question One

B) A Scots PIne

Photo Two by© Copyright Richard Law and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Question Two

C) A Yew

Photo Three by © Copyright johnfromnotts and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Question Three

C) Mistletoe

Winter Wonderland 2 – Christmas Plant Folklore

Photo Four by By Tom Ordelman - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2276835

Question 4) C) A specific hawthorn in Glastonbury was believed to flower at Christmas because it grew from a staff planted by Joseph of Arimithea

Photo Five by By Hectonichus - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35718694

Question Five) D) Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata) was believed to flower on Old Christmas Eve (5th January), particularly in the Isle of Man.

Photo Six by Rosser1954, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question Six )B) Ivy (Hedera helix) is considered to be unlucky if brought into the house except between Christmas Eve and Twelfth Night.

Question Seven) A) Holly is actually known as ‘Christmas’ in Cornwall.

Winter Wonderland 3 – Animal Tracks

Photo Eight By DooferKiin - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57543187

Question 8) B) Badger

Photo Nine by © Copyright Michael Graham and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Question 9) D) Fox

Photo Ten by © Copyright Mary and Angus Hogg and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Question 10) A) Otter

Photo 11 by https://www.flickr.com/photos/133222863@N03/32681499362/

Question 11) C) Hare

Winter Wonderland 5 – Rainbow Birds

Photo Twelve By FWS - USFWS website, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10586270

Question 12 Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

Photo Thirteen By Almir Cândido de Almeida - https://www.flickr.com/photos/almircandido/4744381560/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11044242

Question 13 Cock of the Rock (Rupicola rupicola)

Photo Fourteen by By Andreas Trepte - Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38974913

Question 14 Yellowhammer (Emberiza citrinella)

Photo Fifteen by Bernard Spragg. NZ from Christchurch, New Zealand, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 15 Rose-ringed (Ring-necked) Parakeet (Psittacula krameri)

Photo Sixteen by Bjørn Christian Tørrissen, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 16 Victoria Crowned Pigeon (Goura victoria)

Photo Seventeen by Dawn Scranton from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 17 Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea)

Photo Eighteen by _paVan_ from Singapore, Singapore, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 18 Violet-backed starling (Cinnyricinclus leucogaster)

Winter Wonderland 5 – Christmas Food Facts

Photo Nineteen by Jonathunder, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 19 – Parsnips B) Parsnips formed part of the tribute paid to the Emperor Tiberius from Germany

Photo Twenty by Eric Hunt, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 20 – Brussel sprout D) – Brussels sprouts should be avoided if you take blood-thinning medication due to their high levels of Vitamin K

Photo Twenty One by Muffet, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo 21 – Cranberries E) – Cranberry came from ‘Crane-berry’ as the flowers are supposed to look like a long-beaked bird. Also D) – Cranberries too have lots of Vitamin K so should be avoided if you are on blood-thinning medication.

Photo Twenty Two by carol, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 22 – Clementine A) Clementines are named after Brother Clement Rodier who discovered the spontaneous cross between a sweet orange and a Mediterranean mandarin in the garden of his monastery in French Algeria.

Photo Twenty Three by Jean Marconi from Brasil, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 23 – Brazil Nuts C) Brazil nuts have the highest level of dietary selenium of any food.

Winter Wonderland 6 – Christmas ‘Carols’ 

Photo Twenty-Four by Alan D. Wilson, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 24 -D)  Polar Bear

Photo Twenty Five by Jan Frode Haugseth, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 25) B) – Rock Ptarmigan

Photo Twenty-Six by dfaulder, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 26) G) – Snow Bunting

Photo Twenty-Seven by Tony Hisgett, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 27) E) – Snowy Owl and chick

Photo 28 by Alexandre Buisse (Nattfodd), CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 28) A)- Reindeer (the sound you can hear is the tendons in their legs clicking)

Photo Twenty Nine by © Francis C. Franklin / CC-BY-SA-3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Question 29) C) – Robin. The call is surprisingly easy to muddle up with the snow bunting I think!

Photo 30 by Anya Schlich-Davies at https://imaggeo.egu.eu/view/12674/

Question 30) F) – Arctic Fox cub

Sound Credits

All animals sounds in Winter Wonderland 6 were from the BBC Sound Archive BBC Sound Effects (bbcrewind.co.uk)

Photo Credits

Title Photo by Alan Wilson, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo One by © Copyright Peter Bond and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Photo Two by © Copyright Richard Law and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Photo Three by John from Notts – see photo for further details

Photo Four  By Tom Ordelman – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2276835

Photo Five By Hectonichus – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35718694

Photo Six by Rosser1954, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Seven by Bugwoman

Photo Eight By DooferKiin – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57543187

Photo Nine by © Copyright Michael Graham and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Photo Ten by © Copyright Mary and Angus Hogg and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Photo Eleven by Andy Perkins at  https://www.flickr.com/photos/133222863@N03/32681499362/

Photo Twelve By FWS – USFWS website, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10586270

Photo Thirteen By Almir Cândido de Almeida – https://www.flickr.com/photos/almircandido/4744381560/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11044242

Photo Fourteen  By Andreas Trepte – Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38974913

Photo Fifteen by Bernard Spragg. NZ from Christchurch, New Zealand, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Sixteen by Bjørn Christian Tørrissen, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Seventeen by Dawn Scranton from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Eighteen by _paVan_ from Singapore, Singapore, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Nineteen by Jonathunder, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty by Eric Hunt, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty One by Muffet, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty Two by carol, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty Three by Jean Marconi from Brasil, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty-Four by Alan D. Wilson, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty Five by Jan Frode Haugseth, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty-Six by dfaulder, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty-Seven by Tony Hisgett, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty Eight by Alexandre Buisse (Nattfodd), CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twenty Nine by © Francis C. Franklin / CC-BY-SA-3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Photo 30 by Anya Schlich-Davies at https://imaggeo.egu.eu/view/12674/

 

Winter Wonderland 6

"Title

Dear Readers, I am hiding the comments which already have the answers – I have seen them and will mark them, so don’t worry, and well done for being so speedy! I just want to give other people a chance to have a bash uninfluenced 😎.

Dear Readers, well, we’re at the end of the quiz, and today I think we’ve done enough looking at things, so I’d like us to do some listening. Can you match the calls below to the photo of the animal? I have pushed the definition of ‘Christmas’ to include some generally wintery animals, so I hope you’ll forgive me!

As you will remember, I started the quiz on the 19th December and finish today (24th December) – answers for the whole quiz will need to be with me by 5 p.m. UK time on Monday 28th December.

The links for all the previous parts of the quiz are below. Feel free to do as much or as little as you like! And have the best possible Christmas that you can, I am sending enormous virtual hugs to all of you as we navigate this most peculiar of festive seasons together.

Winter Wonderland 1 – Christmas Trees

Winter Wonderland 2 – Christmas Plant Folklore

Winter Wonderland 3 – Animal Tracks

Winter Wonderland 4 – Rainbow Birds

Winter Wonderland 5 – Christmas Fruit and Vegetables

Christmas ‘Carols’

Ok, here we go! Listen to the sounds below, and see if you can match them to the photo of the animal. So, if you think that a polar bear is responsible for sound ‘A’, your answer is 24) A)

Good luck! I think this is an advanced-level quiz 🙂 so mega congratulations to anyone who can figure it out!

A)

B)

C)

D)

E)

F)

G)

Question 24 – Polar Bear

Question 25 – Rock Ptarmigan

Question 26 – Snow Bunting

Question 27 – Snowy Owl and chick

Question 28 – Reindeer Running!

Question 29 – Robin

Photo 30 by Anya Schlich-Davies at https://imaggeo.egu.eu/view/12674/

Question 30 – Arctic Fox cub

Winter Wonderland 5

Title Photo by James Petts from London, England, CC BY-SA 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Christmas pudding! (Title Photo)

Dear Readers, are you a brussels sprout boffin? A parsnip partisan? A cranberry celebrant? Let’s see what you know about the foods that go to make the average UK Christmas dinner add a whopping 5200 calories to your intake.

Just match the food fact to the photograph. So, if you think that the parsnip is named after a French monk,  your answer is 19) A

As you will remember, I started the quiz  on the 19th December and will finish on Christmas Eve (24th December) – answers for the whole quiz will need to be with me by 5 p.m. UK time on Monday 28th December.

If you missed yesterday’s quiz, just search the blog for ‘Winter Wonderland’ and this should bring you up all parts of the quiz. I am also going to include the links for the whole quiz on Christmas Eve, just in case you are bored after eating mince pies and watching It’s A Wonderful Life for the umpteenth time.

Christmas Food Facts

A) Which Christmas food was named after the French monk living in North Africa at the start of the 20th Century who discovered how to crossbreed it?

B) Which Christmas food was so valued by the Romans that the Emperor Tiberius received it as part of his tribute from Germany?

C) Which Christmas food has the highest density of the element Selenium, with a one ounce serving providing ten times the recommended daily requirement of an adult?

D) Which Two of these Christmas foods should you avoid eating in large quantities if you’re on blood-thinning medication, due to its high level of Vitamin K?

E) The flowers of which Christmas food are said to resemble the head of a water bird?

Photo Nineteen by Jonathunder, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 19 – Parsnips

Photo Twenty by Eric Hunt, CC BY-SA 3.0 <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 20 – Brussel sprout

Photo Twenty One by Muffet, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo 21 – Cranberries

Photo Twenty Two by carol, CC BY-SA 3.0 <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 22 – Clementine

Photo Twenty Three by Jean Marconi from Brasil, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 23 – Brazil Nuts

Winter Wonderland 2

Dear Readers, I do love a bit of festive folklore, so here are three questions for today. As you will remember, I am doing a short quiz starting yesterday and finishing on Christmas Eve (24th December) – answers for the whole quiz will need to be with me by 5 p.m. UK time on Monday 28th December.

If you missed yesterday’s quiz, just search the blog for ‘Winter Wonderland’ and this should bring you up all parts of the quiz.

Christmas Plant Folklore

Here we go! Which of the plants pictured below:

A) Is actually known as ‘Christmas’ in Cornwall?

B) Is considered to be unlucky if brought into the house except between Christmas Eve and Twelfth Night?

C) Was believed to flower at Christmas because it grew from a staff planted by Joseph of Arimithea?

D) Was believed to flower on Old Christmas Eve (5th January), particularly in the Isle of Man?

Just match the plant to the folklore. So, if you think the plant known as ‘Christmas’ is Hawthorn, your answer is 4) A.

Photo Four by By Tom Ordelman - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2276835

Question 4) Hawthorn (Craetagus monogyna)

Photo Five by By Hectonichus - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35718694

Question 5) Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata)

Photo Six by Rosser1954, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Question 6) Ivy (Hedera helix)

Question 7) Holly (Ilex aquifolium)

 

 

Saturday Quiz – Winter Wonderland 1

Title Photo byAlan Wilson, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Polar Bear (Title Photo)

Dear Readers, this week we’re going to do something a bit different. Every day until Christmas Eve we’ll have some questions about winter plants and animals, and all you’ll have to do is to answer the multiple choice underneath the photo.  I will be doing my normal posts as well (though they might be a bit shorter what with Christmas and all…)

What would be easiest for me would be if you’d save up all your answers and then post them in the comments by 5 p.m. on Monday 28th December just to give us all a bit of time. The last questions will be on Christmas Eve (Thursday 24th December ) Answers on Tuesday 29th December.

So, here we go….

Winter Trees

Photo One byhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Question One

Is this magnificent tree

A) A Douglas Fir

B) A Scots PIne

C) A Larch

D) A Sitka Spruce?

Photo Two by© Copyright Richard Law and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Question Two

What’s that fine tree with all the snow on it? Every part of it, except the flesh on the berries, is poisonous.

Is it

A) A Laburnum

B) An Elm

C) A Yew

D) A Horse Chestnut?

Photo Three by © Copyright johnfromnotts and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Question Three

Goodness, what’s made those baubles in this tree?

A) A squirrel

B) A gall called a witches broom

C) Mistletoe

D Those pesky grey squirrels.

So that’s it for today, stay tuned for tomorrow….