Sunday Quiz – Pink and Blue

Antirrhinums

Dear Readers, this quiz was inspired by happenings at my workplace, where two of my colleagues are expecting babies in the autumn. I should point out that neither they nor I are wedded to this idea of pink-for-a-girl-and-blue-for-a-boy, but my garden does have a blue/pink/white theme, and as so many of my favourite UK wildflowers are in these colours  I couldn’t resist. As usual, this is in two parts: blue first and then pink, and to make it a (bit) easier, it’s multiple choice.

Please submit your answers in the comments by 5 p.m. Monday (UK) time if you want to be marked, but it’s fine to just play along in private :-). If you intend to put your answers in the comments, you might want to write them down first to avoid being side-tracked by any speedy Peeps. Have fun!

Part One – Blue UK Wildflowers

Your choices are:

a) Common Lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis)

b) Ground ivy (Glechoma hederofolia)

c) Borage (Borago officinalis)

d) Trailing bellflower (Campanula poscharskyana)

e) Bugle (Ajuga reptens)

f) Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

g) Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

h) Green alkanet (Pentaglottis sempervirens)

i) Wood forget-me-not (Myosotis sylvatica)

j) Periwinkle (Vinca major)

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

7)8)

10)

Part Two – Pink 

k) Redshank (Persicaria maculosa)

l) Common mallow (Malva neglecta)

m) Lesser burdock ( Actium minus)

n) Red deadnettle (Lamium pupureum)

o) Field bindweed (Convulvulus arvensis)

p) Red clover (Trifolium pratense)

q) Red campion (Silene dioica)

r) Everlasting broad-leaved pea (Lathyrus latifolia)

s) Red valerian (Centranthus ruber)

t) Hedge woundwort (Stachys sylvatica)

11)

12)

13)

14)

15)

16)

17)

18)

19)

20)

And here’s a bonus: several of these plants can have both blue and pink flowers at the same time. Can you name them, and tell me why?

5 thoughts on “Sunday Quiz – Pink and Blue

  1. Fran & Bobby Freelove

    1,f
    2,h
    3,a
    4,j
    5,e
    6,b
    7,i
    8,c
    9,d
    10,g
    11,m
    12,o
    13,r
    14,l
    15,t
    16,p
    17,s
    18,q
    19,k
    20,n

    Reply
  2. FEARN

    a3
    b6
    c8
    d9
    e5
    f1
    g10
    h2
    l7
    j4

    k19
    l14
    m11
    n20
    o12
    p16
    q18
    r13
    s17
    t15

    lungwort is both red and green and so too is vipers bugloss (not on your list) I await enlightenment as to why this should be!

    Reply
  3. Liz Norbury

    Here are my answers: 1 f Bluebell
    2 h Green alkanet
    3 a Lungwort
    4 j Periwinkle
    5 e Bugle
    6 b Ground ivy
    7 I Wood forget-me-not
    8 c Borage
    9 d Trailing bellflower
    10 g Lavender
    11 m Lesser burdock
    12 o Field bindweed
    13 r Everlasting pea
    14 l Common mallow
    15 t Hedge woundwort
    16 p Red clover
    17 s Red valerian
    18 q Red campion
    19 k Redshank
    20 n Red deadnettle

    When there are pink and blue flowers on the same plant, it’s because the blue ones haven’t been fertilised,and the blue ones have. As far as I know, lungwort and borage are the only two on this list which this applies to, but as you said there are several, I may have missed some!
    I really enjoyed this quiz, as it featured some of my favourite flowers – my front garden is mostly pink and blue. Trailing bellflower has got a bit out of hand on the left of the path (although it’s looking very pretty at the moment), and periwinkle is definitely out of control on the right of the path! The ceanothus has been spectacular as usual, although the flowers are starting to fade now, and a purple hebe is about to burst into bloom.

    Reply
  4. Alittlebitoutoffocus

    a5
    b6
    c8
    d3
    e9
    f1
    g10
    h2
    i7
    j4
    k19
    l14
    m11
    n20
    o12
    p16
    q18
    r13
    s17
    t15
    The only one I’ve seen in pink and blue is the Forget me Not. (I even took a picture of them both together today – see post tomorrow, maybe). So, if it’s not to do with the Ph value of the soil (which I doubt because they always turn blue eventually) then I’m thinking the pink ones must turn blue (via some clever, technical botanical mechanism) as they ‘mature'(?) Just in time, I hope… 😊

    Reply

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