Saturday Quiz – Wasp, Moth, Bee or Fly? The Answers!

Title Photo by Siga, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Hornet Hoverfly (Volucella zonaria) (Title Photo)

Dear Readers, unusually we have a clear and run away winner this week, with Fran and Bobby Freelove not only getting all the insects in the right groups, but naming pretty much all of the species – they end up with 22.5 out of 24 (I was giving one mark for the correct species and one for the correct family). And in the following pack, we have Leo with 12 out of 12 for family ID, Claire with 11 and Mike with 10. It was a very tricky quiz so well done to everyone who took part!

Handy hints: Flies always have those big compound eyes which take up most of their faces (clearly seen in the title photo, and in the marmalade hoverfly). They also always have teeny tiny antennae. Flies also only have two wings, although this isn’t so easy to see in all of the photos.

Moths have thick, extravagant antennae, and no waist at all.

Bees often have antennae with a ‘kink’ or elbow in them, and have small oval-shaped eyes. They can be hairy, but then so can everyone else (have a look at the beefly). They have four wings, which, along with their eyes, is the easiest way of distinguishing them from flies.

Wasps tend to be slender, with a marked ‘waist’, but I think they are probably the hardest group to definitely identify. This is not helped by there being many families of ‘wasps’ – the ruby-tailed wasp in the first photo is in a different family from the other two examples. In this quiz, it was probably easiest to assume that if you didn’t know what it was, it was a wasp.

Photo One by gailhampshire from Cradley, Malvern, U.K, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

1) Ruby-tailed Wasp (Chrysis Ignita) – WASP

Photo Two by Hectonichus, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

2) Ivy Bee (Colletes hederae) – BEE

Photo Three by André Karwath aka Aka, CC BY-SA 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5>, via Wikimedia Commons

3) Marmalade Hoverfly (Episyrphus balteatus) – FLY

Photo Four by jp hamon, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

4) Dark-Edged Beefly (Bombylius major) – FLY

Photo Five by gailhampshire from Cradley, Malvern, U.K, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

5) Hairy-Footed Flower Bee (Anthophora plumipes) – BEE

Photo Six by By Ian Kimber - Photo by Ian Kimber of ukmoths.org.uk who kindly granted permission by e-mail to use under a GFDL and/or CC-BY-SA license., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1313245

6) Lunar Hornet Moth (Sesia bembeciformis) – MOTH

Photo Seven by Alvesgaspar, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

7) Heath Potter Wasp (Eumenes coarctatus) – WASP

Photo Eight By Bruce Marlin - Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=662209

8) Wool Carder Bee (Anthidium manicatum) – BEE

Photo Nine by Lamiot, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

9) Six-Belted Clearwing (Bembecia ichneumoniformis) – MOTH

Photo Ten by By Algirdas - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1803749

10) Tachina fera (Hoverfly) – FLY

Photo Eleven by Slimguy, CC BY 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

11) Big-Headed Digger Wasp (Ectemnius cephalotes) – WASP

Photo Twelve by M kutera, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

12) Narrow-Bordered Bee Hawkmoth (Hemaris tityus) MOTH

Photo Credits

Title Photo by Siga, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo One by gailhampshire from Cradley, Malvern, U.K, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Two by Hectonichus, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Three by André Karwath aka Aka, CC BY-SA 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Four by jp hamon, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Five by gailhampshire from Cradley, Malvern, U.K, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Six by By Ian Kimber – Photo by Ian Kimber of ukmoths.org.uk who kindly granted permission by e-mail to use under a GFDL and/or CC-BY-SA license., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1313245

Photo Seven by Alvesgaspar, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Eight By Bruce Marlin – Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=662209

Photo Nine by Lamiot, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Ten  By Algirdas – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1803749

Photo Eleven by Slimguy, CC BY 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo Twelve by M kutera, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

2 thoughts on “Saturday Quiz – Wasp, Moth, Bee or Fly? The Answers!

  1. Claire

    I will remember to check the antennae next time…not so easy to do in real life, though… Anyway, two very easily identifiable specimens : Bombus terrestris, tried to invade my kitchen yesterday, The cat called me(!) and together we guided them back to the garden. I would rather not have a nest in my flowerpots, even though I appreciate the importance of pollinators.Last year, leafcutter bees have buried eggs in a pot of mint , no news of them yet…

    Reply

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