Sunday Quiz – Christmas Trivia

Photo One from https://notesfrompoland.com/2021/12/14/blood-donors-in-poland-to-receive-free-christmas-tree-from-state-forests/

(Photo One)

Dear Readers, as Christmas is nearly upon us, this week we have a simple trivia quiz. Answers in the comments by 5 p.m. on Thursday 23rd December please (one day earlier than usual), and I will let you know the results on Christmas Eve. As usual I will remove your answers as soon as I see them.

This year I am going to run a 12 Days of Christmas Quiz. Each day between Christmas and January 5th there will be a post very loosely based on the old song, the 12 Days of Christmas, and a question to go with it, for you to enjoy at your leisure. I will give you more details on the day, but hopefully it will be fun (and won’t close until Friday January 7th so you’ll have lots of time to play when the festivities are over if you prefer).

But here’s today’s quiz. Onwards!

Question One

Have a listen to this and tell me what Christmas-related animal is making this sound.

Question Two

What sex is this holly bush?

Holly berries by the River Lagan by Albert Bridge

Question Three

If you saw this bee buzzing about in the autumn, which Christmassy plant is likely to be nearby?

Photo by Charles Sharp

Question Four

The world record for the number of brussels sprouts eaten in one minute is held by Linus Urbanec of Sweden. How many did he eat?

Question Five

Which popular Christmas vegetable was so liked by the Roman Emperor Tiberius  that he accepted it as part of the tribute paid to Rome by Germany?

Question Six

Why is a robin called a ‘red breast’ when it’s actually closer to the colour orange?

Question Seven

Which unfortunate bird was hunted on St Stephen’s Day in Ireland and on the Isle of Man until recent times?

Question Eight

What Christmas animal makes this sound?

Question Nine

Which is the only nut (much loved at Christmas) that contains significant amounts of Vitamin C?

Question Ten

And finally, which Christmas bird is making these sounds (and why are you unlikely to hear them these days?)

Leave a Reply