Sunday Quiz – Who’s That Bird?

Dear Readers, I have long been a fan of the Crossley ID Guide to the Birds of Britain and Ireland, and, with the RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch coming up next weekend I thought I would invite you to try your hand at identifying the bird from the description in the guide. I find that this book, co-authored by Richard Crossley and Dominic Couzens, has a gift for summing up a bird in just a sentence, so this week what I’d like you to have a bash at is simply matching the photo of the bird to the description, with a bonus point for identifying the species. All the birds are ones that you might, if you’re lucky, see in your garden.

As usual, you have until 5 p.m. UK time on Friday (28th January) to put your answers in the comments. I will disappear them as soon as I see them, but write your answers down first if you’re easily influenced (like me). I will post the answers next Saturday (29th January).

So, if you think that description 1) relates to the bird in Photo A, and that the bird featured is a flamingo, your answer is 1) A) Flamingo (though I think that a visit to Spec Savers might be a good idea).

Onwards!

Descriptions

  1. Compensates for size by noisy and overwrought personality. Unexpectedly loud song explodes from near ground level, a hurried jumble of sweet liquid notes, including a jarring trill mid-phrase, overall like excitable commentator enthusing over finish of race.
  2. Has a red-hot sex life in which both males and females may hold multiple mates, with fractious consequences.
  3. Parents feed large broods (average 10+) for 2 weeks, making 1000 visits a day carrying caterpillars.
  4. Cheerful chiming song, a much varying repetition of two notes TEEcher, TEEcher, can be heard everywhere from late Dec until May.
  5. Very common mite of woodland and scrub, now increasingly visiting gardens, where it feeds from hanging feeders. Bands of 5-10 relatives spend autumn and winter patrolling large territory, where individuals feed in branches for just a few moments before moving on to the next tree, one after another, always restlessly passing through.
  6. Forages on lawns or fields for worms, standing still for a few moments, then making scampering runs forward to grab prey, or stand watchful again: may also make 2-footed hops forward.
  7. Makes monotonous 3-note cooing in rhythm of football chant U-NIII-ted; also calls after alighting, a curious mewing with tone of party trumpet.
  8. Flight display in straight line: bird rises with wing flaps, stalls as if shot, glides down. When landing, raises tail and slowly drops it.
  9. Astonishingly aggressive: spats routine, killing regular.
  10. Usually seen adorning thistle-heads, where it can perch horizontal, hold onto the side or hang upside down, often fluttering its wings for balance.

Birds

Photo One Ken Billington, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

A)

Photo Two by Andreas Trepte, CC BY-SA 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5>, via Wikimedia Commons

B)

Photo Three Henk Monster, CC BY 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

C)

Photo Four by Alpsdake1, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

D)

Photo Five by © Francis C. Franklin / CC-BY-SA-3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

E)

Photo Six by © Francis C. Franklin / CC-BY-SA-3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

F)

Photo Seven by Charles J. Sharp, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

G)

Photo Eight by Keven Law, CC BY-SA 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

H)

Photo Nine by By Charles J. Sharp - Own work, from Sharp Photography, sharpphotography.co.uk, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=104326588

I)

Photo Ten by Trish Steel, CC BY-SA 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

J)

4 thoughts on “Sunday Quiz – Who’s That Bird?

  1. Rosalind Atkins

    Well, Mark and I had some fun with this one! There was much: “Oh, that describes a … “ followed by: “No, THAT’s the … “ and retrieving of long-forgotten words and facts, probably entirely out of context. We hope to have given you a laugh at least ;0

    1) D Wren
    2) I Sparrow
    3) F Blue Tit
    4) G Collared Dove
    5) C Long-Tailed Tit
    6) B Blackbird
    7) J Wood pigeon
    8) E Goldfinch
    9) H Robin
    10) A Great Tit

    Reply
    1. Bug Woman Post author

      Oh I missed seeing this when I did the answers Rosalind, so sorry! You got 6 out of ten too, plus extra marks for getting (most of) the birds right.

      Reply

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